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1 The Watershed: Why Mineral Water is the Healthiest Water to Drink 1
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Ever wonder which of the dozens of brands of bottled water available at the local supermarket is best? This page, produced by a company that manufactures water filtration devices, explains that water that has not been distilled or otherwise stripped of its mineral content is the healthiest for humans to drink. Page includes a good number of references, all of which back up its claims in order to sell its products. The company is based in Michigan, and at the bottom of the page is an analysis of the water its products help to make.




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6/6/2002
2 THE MERCK MANUAL, Sec. 2, Ch. 12, Water, Electrolyte, Mineral, And Acid-Base Metabolism : Water and Sodium Metabolism 2
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Excerpt from the online edition of the Merck Manual  explains in great detail the functioning of the body's water metabolism. Technical prose outlines the relationship between sodium (Na) and water, describing how sodium losses inevitably correlate to water losses and how various conditions develop--hypernatremia, hyponatremia, extracellular fluid volume contraction and expansion, and more. Plenty of specific data and detailed information on the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of these conditions are available. Formula for determining osmolality is also given.




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Internal Medicine
Prevention
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6/6/2002
3 Virtual Naval Hospital: General Medical Officer Manual: Clinical Section : Pediatrics : Pediatric Dehydration 2
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Technical document excerpted from the General Medical Officer Manual of the U.S. Navy explains how doctors should treat children presenting with symptoms of dehydration. Chart describes the three classifications of dehydration--isotonic, hypotonic, and hypertonic--and outline precise treatment guidelines, including types of IVs or oral rehydrating agents to administer. Information is thorough and very direct but offers little background explanation.




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Pediatrics
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6/6/2002
4 Preventing Dehydration 2
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The HealthLink service from the Medical College of Wisconsin presents this entry on preventing dehydration. It offers a slew of facts and figures about the important role water plays in the human body--that it composes 75% of our brain mass, that we lose two cups per day simply by breathing, and so on. It also offers concrete steps individuals can take to avoid the possibility of becoming seriously dehydrated; these include, of course, plenty of liquid intake, as well as avoiding carbonation and caffeine. Page is easy to read and covers mainly dehydration issues in developed nations--not the more serious dehydration problems of the third world.




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6/6/2002
5 Fluid balance test 1
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Curious how much water you lose through sweat during a workout? This page will tell you. It comprises a printable worksheet on which users enter various bits of information, including their weight before the exercise, the amount of water consumed during the workout, and their weight after the workout. A chart helps users decipher their results. Page is part of a series of pages on the effects of heat and dehydration. Hit the "Return" link at the bottom of the page to access site's other related resources.




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Sports Medicine
Web

6/6/2002
6 Edema and Water Retention 1
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Doctor John G. Hipps, M.D., explains a bit about the body's water retaining features. He notes that it is quite common for body weight to vary by three to five pounds daily due simply to the retention or expulsion of water and briefly outlines how this is regulated (those who are more active lose more water, those who eat more vegetables gain more water, etc.). Page is part of a larger website on Hipps' experiences as a country doctor.




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6/6/2002
7 Dry airplane air can cause dehydration 2
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According to author and aviation specialist Diana Fairechild, the air inside passenger jetliners is drier than any air on Earth. While relative humidity is "20% to 25% in the Sahara or Arabian deserts," most people flourish with a relative humidity of around 50%. Fairechild offers tips on adjusting to dry airplane conditions on this page, including drinking eight ounces of water every hour, breathing through a water-saturated hanky, and spritzing your face with water. She notes that these methods of avoiding dehydration help to improve health and to mitigate the effects of jetlag. Page is detailed and written in a convivial, helpful manner.




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6/6/2002
8 www.rehydrate.org : Why Is Dehydration So Dangerous? 2
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Page explains why dehydration can be such a dangerous problem. It describes the symptoms of mild, moderate, and sever dehydration alongside an illustration of a dehydrated infant. It also explains how dehydration--often caused by diarrhea--causes millions of infant deaths each year, detailing exactly how important it is to check the condition before it increases in severity. Page is part of a comprehensive website on the topic of dehyrdration and rehydration in the developing world.




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6/6/2002
9 QuickCare : Dehydration 2
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Dehydration kills millions in the developing world every year as an effect of diarrhea caused by diseases such as dysentery or cholera. While those in the developed world fare better, the condition in its mild and moderate forms is a common occurrence and must be treated promptly to ensure optimum health. This page outlines the symptoms of dehydration in its mild, moderate, and severe incarnations and offers advice on how to treat it. Page notes that those with severe dehydration must be seen by a medical professional immediately, as self treatment is often ineffective without a supplemental dosage of salts administered by IV.




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6/6/2002
10 HealthCentral - General Encyclopedia - dehydration 1
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The HealthCentral entry on dehydration informs users that excessive sweating and exercise, vomiting, diarrhea, and polyuria can all cause the condition. It cautions parents especially to be aware of how much liquid their children are consuming, especially when sick; severe illnesses can often lead to lack of appetite and thirst, and dehydration is especially dangerous at these times. Details on complications and suggested treatment are also offered on this concise and reader-friendly page.




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6/6/2002
11 Dehydration 1
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Article from the NFPT Personal Trainer  magazine discusses the phenomenon of dehydration and how to avoid it. It notes that some athletes take diuretics to reduce their water weight before sporting events but that this can have dire consequences: many have experienced severe heart problems due to the dehydration caused by this practice, and some have even died. Details on the signs and symptoms of dehydration are available as are tips on how to maintain healthy levels of water in the body.




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Sports Medicine
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6/6/2002
12 Yahoo! Groups : wernicke_korsakoff_syndrome 2
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Folks affected by Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) find support from others in similar situations via this e-mail group hosted by the Yahoo! Groups service. WKS is a manifestation of severe thiamine deficiency; it is generally caused by chronic alcoholism. It causes neurological symptoms that, if untreated, lead to severe psychosis and death. Friends and family of those with the condition commiserate via this group's low-volume e-mail list.




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Neurology
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6/6/2002
13 FCA: Clearinghouse: Factsheets: Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (Alcohol-Related Dementia) 2
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The Family Caregiver Alliance offers this very thorough and easy-to-understand fact sheet on Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), a neurological condition caused by alcohol-induced thiamine deficiency. Learn about the symptoms, the difficult diagnosis (the condition is often confused simply with drunkenness), and the prognosis/treatment of this condition. Also find lengthy, compassionate instructions for family members and loved ones who face the task of caring for those affected by the disease. References to other resources--journal articles, organizations, and websites--conclude the article.




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Neurology
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6/6/2002
14 THE WERNICKE-KORSAKOFF SYNDROME CAN BE TREATED 2
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New information about Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) developed in recent years means that patients formerly regarded as hopeless cases may now be able to be treated effectively. So says this article, released by the Britain-based Medical Council on Alcohol. It notes that the "class triad" of symptoms that define the condition--confusion, abducens/conjugate palsies/nystagmus, and ataxia of gait--are often overlooked as simply the effects of alcohol itself. Article also provides new guidelines for diagnosising and treating the condition to prevent the development of Korsakoff's psychosis, which is much more difficult to treat.




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Neurology
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6/6/2002
15 HealthCentral - General Encyclopedia - Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome 2
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The HealthCentral website offers quite thorough information on Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, a manifestation of thiamine deficiency that occurs most pronouncedly among chronic alcoholics. Detailed page outlines the causes, symptoms, and treatment of this condition in easy-to-read terms. It notes that the condition will lead directly to death if untreated, and that treatment involves cessation of all alcohol consumption and injections of vitamin B-1 (thiamine). Still, many of the effects of this condition (such as memory loss) remain despite all forms of treatment.




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Neurology
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6/6/2002
16 wernick korsakoff syndrome 1
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Brief entry on Wernicke Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) offers two paragraphs describing the condition, which is a thiamine deficiency seen most acutely among chronic alcoholics. Photographs of both Carl Wernicke and Sergei Korsakoff are also available; click on them to learn about their biographies. Page is part of a series of general medical science pages offered as part of a college course at the University of Idaho.




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Neurology
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6/6/2002
17 The Medical Council on Alcohol : Prevention and Treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome (WKS) in Accident & Emergency Departments (A&E;) 2
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The Medical Council on Alcohol, a British organization dedicated to studying the medical effects of alcohol, presents this page on Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), a condition the develops due to alcohol-induced thiamine deficiency. Page discusses the proper way to diagnose and treat the condition in an emergency medicine setting. It suggests that doctors treat all patients who exhibit evidence of chronic alcohol misuse, as the signs and symptoms of WKS tend to be difficult to differentiate from severe alcoholism generally. Specifics on IVs that should be administered and further treatment that should be recommended are also offered.




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Neurology
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6/6/2002
18 THE MERCK MANUAL, Sec. 1, Ch. 4, Mineral Deficiency And Toxicity : Zinc 1
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Zinc deficiency can cause impaired taste, impaired wound healing, delayed sexual development, and a variety of other symptoms, according to this excerpt from the professional edition of the Merck Manual.  Luckily, all of these symptoms are easily treated with supplementation. Page outlines how to diagnose the condition with laboratory tests and how to administer supplements. A brief paragraph at the end discusses the effects of zinc toxicity, which are mainly neurological and which tend to affect those who work with zinc in an industrial setting.




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6/5/2002
19 THE MERCK MANUAL, Sec. 1, Ch. 3, Vitamin Deficiency, Dependency, And Toxicity : Vitamin E Deficiency 1
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Page from the online professional edition of the respected Merck Manual  explains the etiology, signs and symptoms, laboratory findings, and treatment of vitamin E deficiency. A wide variety of conditions may caused by deficiency in the vitamin based on which exact type of vitamin E exists in too little concentration (there are several sub-types of the vitamin). Details on treatment are also presented; they vary by cause of the deficiency (i.e., either inadequate consumption or malabsorption).




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6/5/2002
20 THE MERCK MANUAL, Sec. 1, Ch. 3, Vitamin Deficiency, Dependency, And Toxicity : Vitamin D Toxicity 1
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Excerpt from the professional edition of the Merck Manual  describes the signs and symptoms of vitamin D toxicity, a condition that is most dangerous for infants and young children. Symptoms include anorexia, nausea, vomiting, polyuria, polydipsia, and impaired renal function. This set of symptoms is similar to those that occur during any hypercalcemic state, so page stresses the need to determine whether or not excessive vitamin D has been consumed in order to diagnose this condition correctly. Treatment involves ceasing to administer the vitamin.




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6/5/2002

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Full Listing Total: 4913 sites

This is a report from the Medical Resource Reviews Database

© Copyright FIU-HPDRC, 1999. Posted with Permission.